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their business and through their personal lives. [applause] mark will be introducing john carlos. i'm also pleased to welcome kate damon here this evening. kate's business is called k's and it's a graphic design business but it's gotten involved in arranging for the speakers. in this case john lewis to be with us this evening and we are grateful to her. you might recognize her name. she grew up in charlottesville and her mother has something to do with this book festival. [applause] so first, mark. [applause] >> good evening everyone. thanks. thanks for those really nice introductory comments. well, if you haven't seen the picture photo i'm going to remind you of it. [applause] they say that a picture tells a thousand words and in the case of one at tonight's scheduled -- special guests it speaks to us in so many different levels. it's the 13-year-old sports night back in new jersey in 1968 i had several iconic sports photos on my bedroom walls and on my desk. willie mays, the catch, jackie robinson rounding third base screeching in his cleats in his brooklyn dodgers uniform on heading hom
of memory lane. without any further ado, i would like to introduce john maclean the author of "the esperanza fire." after the powerpoint presentation, i will have the panel come up here and we can have some questions and answers. john, thank you. [applause] >> i think you for coming out on a blizzard he day. anyone who is not prepared for an unusual weather event probably shouldn't be reading the "the esperanza fire." a blizzard in southern california is not what you would get typically. i would like to talk briefly about what it was like to do the reporting and writing of this book. i have the byline come i don't sure that with anyone. but it was a democratically constructed project. i did not do this alone. i i could not have done it under normal reporting circumstances. it would've been impossible. what made it possible was the cooperation of the men and women of the united states forest service who are directly involved end of the families of the fallen end of the men and women who pursued and caught raymond euler and put him on death row. it was about this time of year six years ago whe
to look out for. at 1:30 p.m. eastern john mccain takes a look at the restaurants of fire followed by stephen hess at 3:30 to update on the careers of washington reporters we talk to in the 1970s and tonight at 8:00 eastern booktv is live from the 2013 virginia festival of the book, discussion between john lewis and john carlos. at 10:30, john locke presents his book at the brink. will obama push us over the edge? and at 5:00 eastern we bring you a selection of programs honoring the tenth anniversary of the start of the iraq war. these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for complete scheduled visit booktv.org. >> this system of mass incarceration is so deeply rooted in our social political and economic structure is not going to just fade away or downsize, we are on a major upheaval, fairly radical shift in public consciousness. there are many people today who will say there is no hope of ending mass incarceration in america. no. there is no hope. pick another issue. just as many people dying to jim crow in the south, that is a shame and that is the way it is. i find that
being associated with political parties. and john lewis and john carlos talk about their experiences during the civil rights movement. at 10:00 p.m. eastern, our weekly "after words" program. david bernstein sits down with a a special guest. he concludes nights programming at 11:00 p.m. eastern with sandra day o'connor in her book out of order. stories from the history of the supreme court. as a booktv.org for more information on this weekend television schedule. >> you are watching booktv on c-span2. coming up next, fiona deans hallora recounts the life of thomas nast. a regular contributor to harvard weekly, he made the donkey and the elephant the symbols of the the political parties in our country. this is about 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good evening. welcome to the historical society. i want to thank you for joining us tonight. what i know will be a very interesting program. "thomas nast." he is the father of political cartoons. i want to thank you for being here. this is the first time in a while that we have had the ability to start an evening program. i apprecia
. they were not the heirs of the presidency. no one thought of john gardner or harry truman. roosevelt didn't think of him as the mayor of the presidency. he didn't tell him anything. >> he didn't have an office in the white house. >> they didn't of great favor to keep them informed to he been in cabinet meetings. he ran their and the same thing with the national security council. eisenhower sent all three raised in 1957 after nixon became close to john foster dulles after eisenhower's heart attack and he suggested that nixon should visit when the gold coast got its independence. so that's what eisenhower did to try to get mix enough to speed. ki said they don't want someone that is just going to bang a gavel in the senate. >> so there are people who argue that there's the experience of losing such a close election to john f. kennedy in 1960 that the was the trauma. you are laying the foundation for an argument -- no camano. >> he was a father figure and he couldn't please his father figure. >> i'm not going to go into the psychoanalysis. >> everyone else was starting with it. >> i don't th
will be john allison who is president and ceo of the cato institute. before joining cato, he was chairman and ceo of bb and t corporation, the tenth largest u.s. financial services holding company which during his two-decade ten your as ceo -- tenure as ceo grew from $4 billion to $153 billion in assets. john has been recognized as one of the top 100 most successful ceos in the world over the last decade. he also serves on the board of visitors at the business schools of wake forest university, duke university and the university of north carolina at chapel hill. .. vice president for financial institutions, policy and regulatory affairs at the american bankers association where he oversees policy development, regulatory and compliance issues, securities and investments, derivatives policy and risk-management. he was previously assistant secretary of the treasury for financial institutions, a member of the board's investor protection corp. and staff director of the senate banking committee. needless to say, he was not staff director of the senate banking committee when dodd-frank was enact
worker, and inspired by john, she and her partner ran a series of mobile classrooms and schools within the public education system based on the progressive theories of john dewey. the compatriots' railed against the memorization and that children should read and write and do sums on their own timetable and that was even harmful to force them to do it faster. she believed their emotional development was as important as their intellectual development and she said that most important thing that a school could do is get children into the habit of being happy. most importantly, she believed come and her fellow progressive educators believed that a school must instill in children's minds the ability to think independently so that they could participate fully in the american democracy. in 1932, he elizabeth irwin's class's or at p.s. 41 which most of you probably know is on west 11th street, and it still is in the village. the city at that point withdrew its funding from the experiment and the parents were so upset that their children wouldn't be able to take class with elizabeth warren that
a case brought by publisher john wile hi and son where a former university of southern california student was buying cheaper textbooks from his home country of thailand and selling them for profit in the united states. the supreme court decided that copyright holders' rights terminate when their materials are resold in another country. stay up-to-date on breaking news about authors, books and publishing by liking us on facebook at facebook.com/booktv. or follow us on twit wither @booktv. you can also visit our web site, booktv.org, and click on news about books. >> are you interested in being a part of booktv's new online book club? each month we'll discuss a different book and author. this month we'll be discussing michelle alexander's "the new jim crow: mass incarceration in the age of color blindness." pote your thoughts on twit -- post your thoughts on twitter and write on our facebook page. and then on tuesday at 9 p.m. eastern, join our live moderated discussion on twitter, hash tag btv book club. send your suggestions on which books you think we should include in our book club via
, and inspired by john dewey she and a partner ran a series of model classes and schools within the public education system. based on the progressive student -- here to are ris of john dewey -- theories of john dewey. irwin and her come compatriots d against the rote them to zigs and strict discipline of the day. she believed children should read and write and do sums on their own timetable, and that it was even harmful to force them to do it faster. she believed that their emotional development was as important as their intellectual development. she said that the most important thing that a school could do was get children into the habit of being happy. most importantly, she believed and her fellow progressive educators believed that a school must instill in children's minds the ability to think independently so that they could participate fully in the american democracy. in 1932 elizabeth irwin's classes were at tp41 -- ps41, and the city at that point withdrew its funding from the experiment. and the parents were so upset their children would not be able to take classes with elizabeth i
in america than anyplace she had any knowledge john oberst. he also discovered that indeed americans like money. thinking about it and talking about it how did you take these to to things that logically are in conflict with one another if you are going to treasurer ecology how do you simultaneously treasure the rich? is there a paradox if keith will broadly speaking it is a small book that i wrote and along comes. some americans have decided that we are in a place now where it is not possible to reconcile for wealth with a love of democracy and equality that in effect one needs to choose and that it's terribly important that you choose. most americans in the were comfortable enough with the paradox, and one of the things that made them particularly comfortable with the paradox is the fact that in these very rich people had given away so much money. it seemed to be a way in which they embraced the quality and democracy. so there was that resolution of the paradox and here was occupied and wall street and of these people were saying no, no, this is indeed a conflict and it's a conflict that
on the john birch society here. and the primer he defeated a bircher, who was a hero. so nixon's kids were being teased in school by the children. they were glad to get out of here. they moved to new york and in the spring of 63 he had a good job offer. perfect job offer. he didn't have to practice much all. he could give speeches and he could be a named partner bringing in business. wall street firm, became -- all the names council. they were happy. they were going to musicals. eating at the best restaurants. nixon was having lunch with tom dewey and all these also-rans. they were walking along fifth avenue. tricia and julie were going to school. in february of 64 -- spent nixon in new york your i can see. >> and "new york times" reporter really liked nixon. he said nixon was a happy new yorker. so february 64, jack paar's daughter, randy, got tickets for julie and tricia to see the beatles on the ed sullivan show. and suddenly kennedy is killed. that was the end. he was already meeting with republican national committee chairman i think the weekend after kennedy was shot. he could feel i
of? some of the examples would make me feel warm and good, you know, i kind of like john lindsay in retrospect if he made some mistakes, but csh what about -- mayor bloomberg? i think that's another matter all together. i think bloomberg will is the mayor mainly for the financial sector, he's the mayor mainly for the tourists that flood to manhattan, he's the mayor who gave high-rise condo buildings, and allowed the facilitied the direction of working class neighborhoods i lived in new york all my life, i remember manhattan as a place of working class residences and little shops. but now all i see is this stuff that is going up. well, mayor bloomberg, mayor bloomberg is the amorph most affluent people in new york more than he's the mayor of the people of new york. so i just disagree with the confidence that mayorses for all of these reasons, i'm not sure that mayors are more democratic are a kind of anchor of democracy. .. -kimono how much the convenings actually accomplish. but ben thinks that because of the convenings and parliament of mayors he proposes to build -- he seems to
adjective they chose most? hard-working. hard-working john, neil, that sort of thing. wonderful times. we did another on the house, and then beth and i had an opportunity to basically go around the world, do one of foreign correspondents, how they cover the rest of the world for the united states, i can remember being with john from the washington post, in istanbul. he had just come in from kurdistan for the weekend. i said, john, what's your trick for staying alive? and he said, don't wash your car. oh. i asked you for survival technique and you said don't quash your car, he said if anybody is going to my a bomb under it there will be fingerprints on it. don't wash your car. so obviously having done that on the -- how we covered the world, i did through their eyes how the rest of the world covers us, and we now hey reached the point where there would be a final book, clearly after all these books, a final book is supposed to be the future, but i haven't the faint's idea what the future of the media will be. so instead i went back to the beginning. i'm also a professor at gw so besides my
but in the process i met my husband to be john o'connor and he was a year behind me in moscow and we decided to get married and i graduated you both like to eat that met one of us would have to work and that was me. i thought no problem there were at least 40 notices from law firms and california saying law graduates we would be happy to talk to about job opportunities. give us a call. there were 40 different messages. i would call every month not a single one would even give me an interview. why? because we don't hire women. that was the way it was. i got out about 1952 but isn't that amazing? they wouldn't even talk and i really did need to get a job. [laughter] i heard the county attorney from redwood city once had a woman lawyer on the staff and i thought that was encouraging. unaided appointment. in california they elect the county attorney. so he gave me an appointment he was very ninth set -- nice and agreeable and did say he had a woman on his staff and she did well and he would be happy to have another. i had a good resonate and i would be fine but he got his money from the county board of
los angeles. this is on the top john huggins on the bottom. they were killed in january of 69 and the party in los angeles continues to grow very rapidly. by the end of 69 you actually have december 8, 1969 you have a mini-war on 41st in central where the panthers are defending their offices and their first swat teams with hundreds of police with military weapons are actually bombing offices and firing not just from rifles but carriers into the building. they hold off the attacks for six hours. this is to give you a slice. these are not panthers or even potential panthers many of these folks. they are rallying. over 10,000 people rallying in many of them are middle-aged. many of them actually have more moderate politics. here are some of the prisoners in the l.a. shootout. this is seattle. fred hampton, a very vibrant leader from chicago is assassinated in his bed. by the local police working with the fbi. and organizations like the urban league and the naacp turn out in force and protests. here is on the top a rally in new york and on the bottom lima ohio. lima ohio and here
? the party had some resilience to it. here you have los angeles. this is on the top front, carter, john hug givens, on the bottom, erica huggins. they're killed in january '69, and the party in los angeles continues to grow very happenedly so that by the end of -- very rapidly so that by the end of '69 you actually have december 8, 1949, you have a mini war on 41st and central where panthers are defending the offices, um, and the first s.w.a.t. teams, hundreds of police with military weapons are actually bombing the offices and firing, you know, not just from rifles, but from carriers into the building. and they hold off the attack for six hours. here's major mobilization. this is just to give you -- look at the faces. these are not panthers or even potential panthers, many of these folks, in the picture at the bottom rallying after this attack. over 10,000 people rallying, many of them are middle-aged, many actually have more moderate politics. here's some of the prisoners from the l.a. shootout. this is seattle. fred hampton, very vibrant leader from chicago, is assassinated in his bed by
series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> on your screen is american university professor john gould who is a professor noval at the university and also the director of the american university washington institute for public and international affairs and he's written this book how to succeed in college why of really trying. who is this written for? >> guest: it's written for two groups of students, one for high school seniors on their way to college and it's also written for first-year students who come to this place and kind of find it somewhat foreign. i should also add it's written for the parents of the students as well. >> host: when you are asked as a college professor what will make my son or daughter successful what is your short answer? >> guest: ascent of independence and responsibility that this defense parents may not want to hear because that means they have to pull that. when we get them here it's a chance for them to take ownership of their alliance and be responsible for what they need to do and that is th
tv, john lott argues that thanks to president obama we're on the verge of economic and social collapse. it's about an hour, 20. [applause] >> well, i greatly appreciate the chance to be here. you've had quite a few distinguished speakers in the past recently, so it's nice to, i feel honored to be added to the list. i've been asked to talk about the new book that i have that just came out just within the last two weeks. it's entitled "at the brink: will obama push us over the edge?" and i think like maybe a lot of americans there's a lot of really crucial things that are happening right now. i think, unfortunately, in some areas the president's policies have permanently damaged the country. there are other areas where i think we're close, that things can still be fixed, and disaster can be averted in some areas. but i'm going to try to go through a few of the topics that i have, everything from health care to the economy generally to gun control. you know, just on gun control there's been a lot of things that have been happening over just even the past few weeks. i was in colorado a couple
, in the 19th century in england, john henry newman wrote the laity is sometimes more true to the gospel than the hierarchy, and he was denounced in rome and he had to fold the journal in which he wrote that and pius ix issued a syllabus of errors saying not just the laity shouldn't have a say in things, but ordinary people shouldn't have a say in things. democracy is an invalid form of government. the friend and fellow catholic of newman said to gladstone, the prime minister, who said, the pope is just a tact. every form of government, and he said don't worry, catholics don't pay attention to the pope when he talks politics. well, more and more, we're not paying attention, not only on contraceptives which is abandoned by catholics for decades now, but even on things like literal body railism about the body and -- literalism about the body and blood of jesus. the most hold under cattics under 30 done in the 1990s showed that 40% of them already didn't believe that it was the literal body and blood of jesus, catholics under 30, and we don't act that way anymore. there's an old saying, the way
beforehand. but if you folks visit with the existing spec johns, that doesn't get the results. but it creates the opportunity where we can see what is being conducted and then we can go on and say, at least we have charm of spotting what's missing. everything is fantastic, then everything is fixed. in the and secretary board of medical journalism. and then before you get them together, you say well, the paper -- and, it is the end. i can tell you that -- what that? [laughter] [inaudible] [laughter] it is a hard line. i have tried a joke. [laughter] so years after this, the regulations have been put into place. five years later, we finally discovered that it has been ludicrously and widely ignored. published in the top five journals. that is just the papers that were published. academic journalists themselves have a whole bunch of complex interests. they connect cultural things as well. so that will bump up the impact factor of that journal that is derived by the number of citations a get. and it's not even often a full-time job being an academic journal editor. and they pay lots of money for
approach was really founded by john marshall. it's what is the basis of marbury the madison i suppose this is marshall said at the reason my judges have power to override the views of the legislature for the president is the constitution is a law like any other but there's a hierarchy. conflict of law principle. federal level to stay up, constitutional level the federal. treaties of the federal law. in the hierarchy created by the constitution. so when there is a firm with a plot to be found in the constitution, judges have the authority to articulate it. when there's not a rule of law to be found in the constitution, political branches are supposed to have the final say. one of the great clashes in modern jurisprudence is between the people who really believe in the rationale of marbury v. madison that the constitution wins when it is low and the people who think that we've got judicial review, we can make things up as we go along. which is fundamentally wrong. when we the living make things up as we go along, but it's a little. let's see what happens in life we have to make up as we
neighbor attorney-general from john rogers that says he wants to discuss privately. so we came into our dining room and he post the question would you be prepared to except a nomination of the labor party? the have and always had elections and presidents are elected that nobody is opposing but that was a complete surprise. not very positive because the presidency at the time the six presidents and has served were elderly when they were elected because they were not opposed and served with distinction but not proactive so there were important powers of the supreme court if they are unconstitutional to address both houses but mainly it was a ceremonial figure head type of role and the importance role outside ireland and as the first citizen of the country but the power rested with the prime minister and his cabinet in a parliamentary system and the fact that dave decided to nominate a candidate not that the person would win but the labor party was the smallest of the three and it was known they were very literate and it was well known said deputy prime minister tarnished by the largest pa
letter of john brown, represented -- travel to the south under a pseudonym before the civil reporting on slavery, advocated irish home rule so strenuously he became a leader of the land late in new york, let the attempt to create an integrated school system in charleston, south carolina, after tha the cy fell to the union forces in the civil war. but wait, there's more. helped to edit autobiographies of jefferson and davis. published the early works of louisa may alcott. and found the most famous beer in 19th century america. not bad, right? that's a nast met redpath. for many of the most famous lecturers of the time including henry ward beecher, the famous preacher, and mark twain. redpath originated a management system for lecturing which made it possible to lecture at the forefront more people into commit more professional. he personally identified speakers and softer participation. so he literally chased them down. nast wouldn't letter -- wouldn't answer any of redpath's letter. pcor mr. nast and talks to him. nast is in a desperate effort to get them to go wit. and he said if you
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23